Adam Schantz, Sr.

If you’ve gone through the main gates at Woodland Cemetery, you’ve seen the life size bronze statue of a man sitting in a chair, watching you as you enter.

But who is he?

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Lee Lynam

Note: In honor of Peace Officers Memorial Day on May 15th, we decided to share a story about one of Dayton’s own Peace Officers.

January 17, 1880 was a normal day on the beat for Patrolman Lee Lynam. That morning, he arrested a man named John Francis on suspicion of having a gun. Francis was later released and told to “behave.”

But behave, he did not.

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More Interesting Dayton Facts

  • Susan Koerner Wright, mother of Wilbur and Orville, enjoyed making things for and with her children. Reportedly, her husband Milton could not hammer a nail straight, and she was the handy person in the family. She often made toys for the children, and even put together some small appliances to make her household chores easier.
  • In 1900, Dayton listed more inventions than any other city in the United States.
  • John Patterson could not stand Charles Kettering, and would often fire him from his company, NCR. Edward Deeds would always hire him back.
  • During rainy seasons, carriages would get stuck in the mud. To remedy this, huge logs were buried under the mud, lining Dayton streets in a “corduroy” fashion, preventing wagons and animals from sinking.
  • Dayton has a history of big floods. In 1847, the levee broke as a result of residents near the river taking dirt from too close to the levee to fill potholes.
  • James M. Cox, founder of Dayton Daily News, served two terms as Governor of Ohio. He also unsuccessfully ran for President of the United States in 1920.
  • No unsolved murders occurred in Dayton in 1920.
  • Julia Shaw Patterson Carnell believed Dayton should have an art museum. She opened one at St. Clair and Monument in 1920, with 3 exhibits being permanent. Seven years later she offered the city a large, Italian villa style building, finished in 1930. Julia paid the operating expenses for the Dayton Art Institute until she died in 1944.
  • In the late 1950s doctors at WPAFB were given an assignment – to pick out astronauts. Unsure of what astronauts were, they discussed with the government until they concluded that they were something like test pilots. Of the men recruited, they picked men who fit their criteria, arbitrary items such as age, size, height, etc. When the government reviewed the list, they asked why there was no marine on the list. The doctors had picked one out, but he was slightly older and slightly taller than their cutoff points. That man was John Glenn.
  • The David Bernie family was listed in the Guinness Book of World Records in 1976 for having the most physicians in a single family. In the 1930s, General Practitioner David Bernie met Helen Kuhr. Helen’s brother Abe was a family doctor and his wife Hortense specialized in Pulmonary Medicine. Helen and David wed and had eight children. Of the three daughters, all three married doctors, and one became a doctor herself. All five of the boys became doctors. Of their fifteen grandchildren, about five of them became doctors.
  • Washington Presbyterian Church Cemetery, located at the corner of Miamisburg-Centerville Road and Southwind Drive (next to Midas), holds 89 graves, including Revolutionary War General Williams Dodds. The graves range in dates from 1830 to 1898.
  • Reverend David Winters organized the first reformed church located on Ludlow Street. For 17 years, he preached sermons in both English and German, with crowds so large that extra benches would be brought in for accommodation. Many couples wanted him to perform their wedding ceremony, as there was popular belief that any marriage over which he officiated would be prosperous. In his ministry, he married over 5,090 couples. Over time, he retired from the Ludlow Street church to focus on more rural churches until approached by a group of his friends, requesting that he help them found a German Reformed Church. Together with an Evangelical Lutheran Congregation in the neighborhood, the two denominations joined together to build a church. To honor their minister, they named the church David’s Church.

Winter in Dayton

With all the snow we’ve been getting lately, we wanted to share some of our favorite pictures from this winter, and winters past!

Also, if you have any great winter pics to share, please send them to us at daytonunknown@hotmail.com and if we may just share your pictures too! Please make sure to provide your full name for photo credit!

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Dayton’s Unknown

Halloween is coming, and to get into the spirit (HA), here are some of our favorite local spooky stories!

The Story of Bill G. Sloan

Note: Due to the current events across the country in regards to the hurricanes and flooding, we thought we’d share some stories we have previously posted, detailing the heroism from the Dayton Flood of 1913.

March 1913, The Great Dayton Flood.

Rising waters drove people to treetops and attics. People were spotted on rooftops, stranded, but were not able to be rescued. Survivors recount tragic tales, including watching a two-story house floating by, a man, woman, and child stranded helplessly at their front door. As the house was swept along with the current, on an ill-fated journey into the Dayton View Bridge, the man closed the front door suddenly. Moments later, the distinct sound of two gunshots was heard from inside.

Enter William “Bill” G. Sloan.

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