Miamisburg Mound

Located at 900 Mound Street, Miamisburg Mound pre-dates Dayton – but it is very important to Dayton History. Here are some facts:

  • The Mound is actually a burial mound, and it is one of the largest conical mounds in North America, and is the largest conical mound in Ohio.
  • The Mound is listed on the National Register of Historic Places
  • Mounds like this served as cemeteries, and may have also marked boundary lines for tribal territories.
  • The Mound is 65 feet tall. It was originally 68 feet tall, before an excavation attempt in 1869.
  • Built by the Adena people.
  • There are 116 steps leading from the bottom to top.
  • This mound has never been systematically excavated.
  • In 2004, crop circles appeared in the field nearby to the Mound.
  • It is believed that the high hills of Woodland Cemetery and Calvary Cemetery may have also been burial mounds at one time.

221 Years Ago, Tomorrow

“The boat party was the first to arrive. Rounding the curve in the river, where for so many years since then it has been flowing under the Dayton View bridge, the pioneers perceived before their eyes the swift current of Mad River emptying itself into the main channel, just as it had been described, and saying to each other (so we may imagine), ‘Yes, this must be the place,’ they tied the pirogue to a tree at the head of St. Clair Street and led by Mrs. Thompson, all clambered ashore.

At that moment DAYTON came on the map!”

– Charlotte Reeve Conover, The Story of Dayton.

Two hundred and twenty-one years ago tomorrow, Dayton was founded. To honor this occasion, we decided to share some of our favorite pictures we’ve taken around Dayton.

Also, please send us your favorite picture you’ve taken around Dayton, and we’ll feature it in a future blog post! You can send it to our email at daytonunknown@hotmail.com – and be sure to provide your name for photo credit!

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David’s Cemetery Notable Burials

Located at the corner of David Road and Mad River Road in Kettering, David’s Cemetery has many notable burials:

  • Harry Schwab – Dayton golfer, won Senior P.G.A., died July 25th, 1976
  • Hadley Watts – former Superintendent of Centerville Schools, died August 9th, 1969
  • Richard E. Kelchner – founder of Kelchner Excavating Company, died July 15th, 2002
  • Clark Haines – founder of NCR Band in 1973, died 6/23/2001
  • Read More »

    Dayton Hero – David T. Chambers

    The chain of events that started Dayton’s Great Flood started on March 21, 1913, with a rainstorm. Over the next few days, more rain came, ultimately weakening the levees and flooding the already oversaturated soil. Water rose quickly, and as gas lines were destroyed, a fire started downtown that destroyed most of a block.

    As these events were happening, twenty four year old David T. Chambers of North Dayton could not stand by and watch without helping. From the safety of his home, which was located above the flood waters, he could see the damage being caused by the rising waters.

    David climbed into his family boat and rowed out to help. He carried supplies to the safe area in Riverdale and saved over 150 people from where they were stranded by the rising waters. He was killed when a log struck the side of his boat and knocked him into the water. He was carried off by the current and his body was not found until several days later.

    Losing her husband caused Stella Chambers substantial money problems. David was a machinist at NCR while Stella stayed at home with their three daughters, Lorna Elizabeth, Mary Adeline, and Dorothy Ruth. She had to make the difficult decision to place her daughters in an orphanage until she could recover financially. Luckily, Stella was later reunited with her daughters.

    Visit the flood section of Woodland Cemetery and you will find a large flat marker on David’s grave, detailing the heroic acts leading to his death. Stand at the base of this marker and look to your left to see Chambers Street, named in tribute.

    To read the full text of the marker, click here.

    Dayton Firsts Part 4

    It’s that time again! Let’s find out more about the early years of Dayton!

    First Library — The first library association (also the first in the state of Ohio) was formed on February 1, 1805, through an act of the legislature. Rev. William Robinson served as the first president of the organization.

    First Graveyard — Next to the Presbyterian church at the corner of Third Street and Main Street. In 1805, Daniel Cooper gave four acres of land between Ludlow Street and Wilkinson Street to form a cemetery shared by the Presbyterians and Methodists.

    Read More »